Growing Patterns

Growing Patterns

Fibonacci Numbers in Nature

Book - 2010
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The biggest mathematical mystery in nature--Fibonacci numbers! Named after a famous mathematician, the number pattern is simple: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13. . . . Each number in the sequence comes from adding the two numbers before it. What's the mystery? The pattern crops up in the most unexpected places. You'll find it in the disk of a sunflower, the skin of a pineapple, and the spiral of a nautilus shell. No one knows how nature came up with the sequence. Sarah C. and Richard P. Campbell introduce the Fibonacci sequence through a series of stunning photographs in this ALA Notable Children's Book. Young readers will soon be seeing nature through new eyes, looking for Fibonacci numbers in daisies, pinecones, leaf patterns, seashells, and more.
Publisher: Honesdale, Pennsylvania : Boyds Mills Press, [2010]
Edition: First edition.
Copyright Date: ©2010
ISBN: 9781590787526
1590787528
9780605509214
0605509212
Branch Call Number: 512.7 Cam
j 512.72 CAMPBELL
Characteristics: 32 pages : color illustrations ; 20 x 31 cm
Additional Contributors: Campbell, Richard P. - Illustrator
Alternative Title: Fibonacci numbers in nature

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Feb 14, 2013

Fibonacci numbers are a little tricky. Unlike addition or multiplication they are difficult to show to kids as having practical applications in real life. You could discuss how Fibonacci numbers apply to music, but that’s still tricky territory. Nature, however, is a natural complement. Kids understand flowers. Kids can understand duplicating numbers. Put the two together and you’ve the newest picture book format math book to add to your shelves. It does contain a couple difficult concepts, but with the right grown-up by their side, there’s very little in Growing Patterns: Fibonacci Numbers in Nature that a child won’t be able to figure out on their own.

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Feb 14, 2013

ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD thinks this title is suitable for 6 years and over

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Feb 14, 2013

Take a look at these flowers and count the petals you see. One. Two. Three. Five. Eight. Notice anything? These petal numbers add on to one another. One plus two equals three. Two plus three equals five. These numbers are called Fibonacci numbers, and what’s crazy is that as they go they keep showing up in nature and it’s not just in flowers either. If you count spirals on pinecones or sunflowers or pineapples, no matter how you look at them they equal one of these numbers. With brilliant bright photography and simple words, Sarah and Richard Campbell make a math concept understandable. A section on “More About Fibonacci Numbers” and a Glossary of terms appear at the end.

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