Not My Idea

Not My Idea

A Book About Whiteness

Book - 2018
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An honest explanation about how power and privilege factor into the lives of white children, at the expense of other groups, and how they can help seek justice. --THE NEW YORK TIMES

ONE OFHUFFPOST'S RECOMMENDED "ANTI-RACIST BOOKS FOR KIDS AND TEENS"

**A WHITE RAVEN 2019 SELECTION**

NAMED ONE OFSCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL'S BEST BOOKS OF 2018

Not My Idea: A Book About Whiteness is a picture book about racism and racial justice, inviting white children and parents to become curious about racism, accept that it's real, and cultivate justice.

This book does a phenomenal job of explaining how power and privilege affect us from birth, and how we can educate ourselves...Not My Idea is an incredibly important book, one that we should all be using as a catalyst for our anti-racist education. --THE TINY ACTIVIST

Quite frankly, the first book I've seen that provides an honest explanation for kids about the state of race in America today. --ELIZABETH BIRD, librarian

"It's that exact mix of true-to-life humor and unflinching honesty that makes Higginbotham's book work so well..."--PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (*Starred Review)

A much-needed title that provides a strong foundation for critical discussions of white people and racism, particularly for young audiences. Recommended for all collections. --SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL (*Starred Review)

A necessary children's book about whiteness, white supremacy, and resistance... Important, accessible, needed. --KIRKUS REVIEWS

A timely story that addresses racism, civic responsibility, and the concept of whiteness. --FOREWORD REVIEWS

For white folks who aren't sure how to talk to their kids about race, this book is the perfect beginning. --O MAGAZINE

Publisher: New York : Dottir Press, [2018]
Edition: First edition.
Copyright Date: ©2018
ISBN: 9781948340007
1948340003
Branch Call Number: j 305.8009 HIGGINBO
Characteristics: 64 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.

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LPL_KarenA Sep 19, 2018

Another book from the "Ordinary Terrible Things" series that delves into topics that can be hard for some to talk about with children. "Not My Idea" is an important look at whiteness for kids and parents to explore racial identity and privilege together. Higgenbotham presents ... Read More »


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IndyPL_ShellieR Mar 20, 2020

Well-oriented toward the target audience (early to middle elementary) this book manages to assign responsibility without shaming or blaming children. I think it would be difficult for a child to make sense of this without an adult to talk it over with but it could be a great tool for families, churches and progressive classrooms.

JCLS_Ashland_Kristin Dec 05, 2018

A unique book that is the only one I've found that deals with the concept of whiteness for young readers. It will be helpful for framing conversations about the often-uncomfortable topic of race. An excellent addition to the "Ordinary Terrible Things" series!

h
Happy_Endings
Nov 08, 2018

Difficult topic addressed head on. Perfect for families open to questions of conscience. Not sure how well this would work if read independently. Would love to hear others’ thoughts!

LPL_KarenA Sep 19, 2018

Another book from the "Ordinary Terrible Things" series that delves into topics that can be hard for some to talk about with children. "Not My Idea" is an important look at whiteness for kids and parents to explore racial identity and privilege together. Higgenbotham presents unique subject matter on what it means to be white for kids, which is not a point of view that is often discussed in children's non-fiction. The included "activities" at the end mostly consist of empowering statements for kids to be persistent in the fight for racial justice. This book is a good jumping off point for parents and caregivers looking for more books about social justice and how to raise racially conscious children.

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