Leave Her to Heaven

Leave Her to Heaven

DVD - 2004
Average Rating:
5
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An extremely possessive woman will do whatever it takes to keep her husband all to herself, even murder.
Publisher: Beverly Hills, Calif. : 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment, c2004.
Edition: Full frame version.
Branch Call Number: DVD MOVIE DRAMA
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (approximately 110 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Additional Contributors: Williams, Ben Ames 1889-1953.

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Fuzzy_Wuzzy
Nov 19, 2017

(*Most memorable movie-quote*) - "Yes! She was that sort of monster!!"

Keeping the above movie-quote firmly in mind - You can be sure that "Leave Her To Heaven" was, indeed, yet another 1940's monster movie where (this time around) the "monstrous one" was none other than the immaculately groomed, Hollywood, glamour-girl, Gene Tierney, whose wooden performance made Frankenstein's clumsy lumbering around look like high-energy aerobics by comparison.

Boy-oh-Boy!! - 70 years ago - This film's preposterous story-line may have worked its deceitful charm on its gullible audience. But, hey! - Let me tell ya - Today - Its painfully contrived and laughably predictable story repeatedly gave itself away at every plot twist and turn - Yeah - Right up to its over-the-top finale of a "courtroom-drama" showdown that took scenery-chewing to a whole new level of camp and kitsch.

p
patch666
May 02, 2017

Gene Tierney is so beautiful!!!!

Vincent T Lombardo Dec 01, 2015

A suspenseful, terrific melodrama! The screenplay is excellent, and the cast is wonderful, particularly Gene Tierney, who is beautiful, sexy, beguiling -- and evil!

7duffy Sep 15, 2015

It's hard to tell which is more stunning, Gene Tierney or the techni-color in the cinematography. Both are beyond comparison. Gene Tierney gives a good performance as a psychologically afflicted woman. Decent noir story, but not as tense or suspenseful as I would have liked.

n
Nursebob
Dec 05, 2014

While en route to New Mexico for some R&R bestselling author Richard Harland (Cornel Wilde limited to two facial expressions) meets fellow train passenger Ellen Berent (Gene Tierney, stunning) a rich but oddly intense debutante with drop dead looks. After a breakneck romance at the family estate Harland suddenly finds himself married to the mysterious heiress after she unceremoniously dumps her intended fiancé (a jilted Vincent Price…not pretty). Sadly all is not sunshine and hugs for the former bachelor as he gradually comes to realize that his beautiful new wife is actually a clingy gorgon with a pathological need to be loved... Presented in its original exaggerated technicolor which caused one critic to label it “rainbow noir”, John Stahl’s creepy tale of amour fou unfolds like a series of colourized postcards featuring attractive pink caucasians against backdrops of impossibly green forests, blue lakes, and red deserts. Thankfully Gene Tierney’s smouldering intensity, all red lipstick and fiery glares, seems refreshingly contemporary in a film which too often crosses over into old fashioned melodrama with makeshift psychology and a glowing sunset finale to rival "Gone With the Wind". However, unlike Glenn Close’s manic fireworks in "Fatal Attraction", Tierney sets her character to slow burn resulting in a downplayed, almost subliminal madness which methodically eats away at all who come in contact with her. Ravishing imagery (which garnered a well-deserved Oscar nod to cinematographer Leon Shamroy) set to an appropriately grand score and a cast of pretty people in crisis make this one a surefire guilty pleasure!

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